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Different Types of Fly Fishing Casts

by Bob Bastian

The art of casting is a very important skill in fly fishing. It requires gradual, synchronized movements. It helps to think of each movement, both the back cast in the forward cast, is divided into three steps. The first is loading, the second is the momentum of projection, and the third is the pause. It takes a lot of practice to master the art of casting in fly fishing.

There are several types of casts. The most common of these include the basic cast, false cast, side and reverse casts, roll cast, and double haul cast.

In fly fishing the easiest cast, called the basic cast, is simply casting the line straight back and then directly forward. Anyone new to fly fishing should master the basic cast before going on to other techniques. Use a short length of line to begin with if you are new to fly fishing. This will help you gain sufficient control of the line, while practicing short gentle movements.

The false cast is a variation of the basic cast. It consists of the same backward and forward movements as the basic cast, and is immediately followed by another set of the same movements. The fly line actually travels backward and forward repeatedly without touching the water. Practicing this type of cast helps to build precise timing that is required in fly fishing.

In fly fishing the side and reverse casts are generally used when wind is a problem. They are also used if there are obstacles that can make a regular cast difficult.

A roll cast is generally used if the fisherman finds himself with his back to such obstacles as a high riverbank or a wall of vegetation. When these conditions exist, a basic cast is almost impossible. You need to let out a good length of line in front of you; it's best to let the current take it a short distance. The drag of the water on the line will load the rod, and you can cast forward without needing to execute the back cast.

Using a double haul cast in fly fishing will enable you to cast a much longer line than is possible with a basic cast. In order to do this you need to have a much faster line speed. This is done by making much larger casting movements, applying more strength, and loading the rod more before the forward cast. During this cast both hands of the fisherman must work independently.

The above five types of fly fishing casts are the ones used most often. There are many other types of casts also, including the S-cast, the parachute cast, and the mend cast.

Casting is the basic physical skill involved in fly fishing. Its purpose is to place the fly exactly where you want it to be, just like any other skill it takes practice. Accuracy and the delicacy of the presentation are very important when fly fishing. Mastering the basics of fly casting first will make it easier to move on to the more difficult casts.
 

Article courtesy of: Bob Bastian
Copyright 2007 Global Sports Zone - Free Sports Articles

 


 
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